Team USA 2016 Prepares for Y7

Team USA 2016 is comprised of accomplished, impressive young professionals from various academic backgrounds and career fields. Individually and collectively, they will present innovative American policy proposals at the Y7.

The Y7 is the official G7 next generation engagement event held under the Japanese G7 Presidency. This year, young professionals from the G7 member countries and invited outreach countries will convene April 30-May 3 in Tokyo, Japan.

The delegates will negotiate on 1) international security, 2) sustainable development, and 3) labor and economy issues to present to the G7 leaders in an approved communiqué.

Marisa DeAngelis

Frances Holuba

Alexandra Kerr

David Livingston

Ian Rinehart

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Team USA 2015 Drives Y20 Process

From 17-20 August, Team USA 2015 participated successfully in the Y20 held in Istanbul, Turkey. The team members contributed substantively to the output of the three working groups: 1) impact of technology and innovation on youth unemployment, 2) youth contributions to peace, 3) youth and education in the 21st century.

The communiqué is available here.

TeamUSA2015Y20

Team USA 2015

Team USA 2015 is comprised of accomplished, impressive young professionals from various academic backgrounds and career fields. Individually and collectively, they will present innovative American policy proposals at the Y20.

The Y20 is the official G20 next generation engagement event held under the Turkish G20 Presidency. This year, young professionals from the G20 member countries and invited outreach countries will convene August 15-21, 2015 in Istanbul, Turkey.

The delegates are expected to negotiate a joint position on enhancing resiliency, strengthening the global recovery, and buttressing sustainability to present to the G20 leaders in an approved communiqué.

Carlos Bortoni | Kate Cyr | Julia Duncan | Patrick Short | Josh Slusher

Y20

G8 & G20 Youth Summits Communiqué

The G8 & G20 Youth Summits were held June 4-8, 2012 at The George Washington University in Washington, DC, USA.

For three days, young professional representatives from the G8 and G20 countries negotiated, drafted, and approved a communiqué on matters related to defense, foreign affairs, justice, development, economics, environment, and finance issues.

Y20 2015 Recruitment Begins

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WHAT IS THE Y20?

The Y20 is a leadership summit that convenes young professionals from G20 countries for one week each year to develop policy solutions to current global challenges. Learn more about the G20.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE Y20?
The Y20 will be taking place August 15-21, 2015 in Istanbul, Turkey.

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE Y20?
Delegates will participate in online discussion groups (pre-Y20) and negotiating working groups (at the Y20) focused on three main issues:

  1. Enhancing Resilience
  2. Strengthening the Global Recovery and Lifting the Potential
  3. Buttressing Sustainability

At the end of the process, a communiqué outlining specific policy proposals is drafted and approved. These recommendations are then circulated to public and private sector leaders.

The Y20 will also consist of workshops with high profile government, business, and civil society speakers; sightseeing and cultural immersion; and networking opportunities with young professionals from around the world.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE IN THE YADL DELEGATION TO THE Y20?
YADL seeks 5 young professionals (US citizens under 30 years of age) with demonstrated leadership experience, intellectual curiosity, international policy capacity, proven communication skills, and multicultural competence. YADL aspires to assemble a team that is creative, diverse, and innovative.

HOW TO APPLY
Submit a single PDF document containing a cover letter and resume to carlos.reyes@yadlusa.org by 11:59PM EST on Friday, February 13, 2015. The cover letter should address the following questions:

  • Why are you applying for the delegation? What skills or expertise do you bring as a delegate?
  • What international issues interest you? How will you represent the United States?
  • What do you hope to gain from the experience? How will this experience advance your career?

OTHER DETAILS
Interviews will be granted to successful candidates after the selection committee reviews applications. Delegates are responsible for transportation to/from Istanbul as well as personal/incidental expenses, but registration, accommodations, and meals for the week are covered.

Team USA 2014

team usa 2014

The Y20 is the official G20 youth event held under the Australian G20 presidency. This year, young professionals from the G20 member countries and invited outreach countries will convene at the Y20. The delegates are expected to negotiate a joint position on growth and job creation, global citizenship and mobility, and sustainable development and express it in a communiqué which will be presented to the G20 leaders.

The Y20 will be held in July 12-15, 2014 in Sydney, Australia.

Learn about the delegation here.

 

 

Y20 Australia Recruitment Process

WHAT IS THE Y20?
The Y20 is a leadership summit that convenes young professionals from G20 countries for one week each year to develop policy solutions to current global challenges. Learn more here.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE Y20?
The Y20 will be taking place 12-15 July 2014 in Sydney, Australia.

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE Y20?
Delegates will participate in online discussion groups (pre-Y20) and negotiating working groups (at the Y20) focused on three main issues:

  1. Growth and jobs creation
  2. Global citizenship
  3. Sustainable development

At the end of the process, a communiqué outlining specific policy proposals is drafted and approved. These recommendations are then circulated to public and private sector leaders.

The Y20 will also consist of workshops with high profile government, business, and civil society speakers; sightseeing and cultural immersion; and networking opportunities with young professionals from around the world.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE IN THE YADL DELEGATION TO THE Y20?
YADL seeks 5 young professionals (US citizens under 35 years of age) with demonstrated leadership experience, intellectual curiosity, international policy capacity, proven communication skills, and multicultural competence. YADL aspires to assemble a team that is creative, diverse, and innovative.

HOW TO APPLY
Submit a single PDF document containing a cover letter and resume to carlos.reyes@yadlusa.org by 11:59PM EST on Friday, January 31, 2014. The cover letter should address the following questions:

  • Why are you applying for the delegation? What skills or expertise do you bring as a delegate?
  • What international issues interest you? How will you represent the United States?
  • What do you hope to gain from the experience? How will this experience advance your career?

OTHER DETAILS
Interviews will be granted to successful candidates after the selection committee reviews applications. YADL will arrange a delegation training weekend in late March/early April 2014. Delegates are responsible for transportation to/from Sydney.

Y8 Russia 2014 Recruitment Process

WHAT IS THE Y8?
The Y8 is a leadership summit that convenes young professionals from G8 countries for one week each year to develop policy solutions to current global challenges. Learn more here.

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE Y8?
The Y8 will be taking place from May 14 to 17, 2014 in Moscow, Russia.

WHAT HAPPENS AT THE Y8?
Delegates will participate in online discussion groups (pre-Y8) and negotiating working groups (at the Y8) focused on four main issues:

  1. International security
  2. International development cooperation
  3. Energy security and climate change
  4. Information security and availability

At the end of the process, a communiqué outlining specific policy proposals is drafted and approved. These recommendations are then circulated to public and private sector leaders.

The Y8 will also consist of workshops with high profile government, business, and civil society speakers; sightseeing and cultural immersion; and networking opportunities with young professionals from around the world.

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE IN THE YADL DELEGATION TO THE Y8?
YADL seeks 5 young professionals (US citizens under 35 years of age) with demonstrated leadership experience, intellectual curiosity, international policy capacity, proven communication skills, and multicultural competence. YADL aspires to assemble a team that is creative, diverse, and innovative.

HOW TO APPLY
Submit a single PDF document containing a cover letter and resume to carlos.reyes@yadlusa.org by 11:59PM EST on Friday, January 3, 2014. The cover letter should address the following questions:

  • Why are you applying for the delegation? What skills or expertise do you bring as a delegate?
  • What international issues interest you? How will you represent the United States?
  • What do you hope to gain from the experience? How will this experience advance your career?

OTHER DETAILS
Interviews will be granted to successful candidates after the selection committee reviews applications. YADL will arrange a delegation training weekend in late March 2014. Delegates are responsible for transportation to/from Moscow.

Y8 Dispatches: Finalizing the Communique

Dispatch from London and Team USA 2013

 

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Afternoon deliberations at the Y8 Summit began with committees working against a 6 p.m. final deadline, after which the Heads of State and Government committee would revise and ratify a final communiqué for the summit.

Early in the afternoon, talks in the Foreign Affairs committee took on the wide-ranging topic of the conflict in Syria, with the U.S. and Russian delegates clashing over key issues and phrasing. American Secretary of State Alex Haber opposed once again putting the need for a “neutral, impartial, international observer team assembled by the UN” before the UN Security Council, and dismissed the possibility that chemical weapons had not been used by either the Syrian government or rebels.

However, by 3 p.m., the committee was able to reach a consensus on wording, strongly condemning the human rights abuses, use of chemical and lethal weapons, and endemic conflict in Syria.

“This is the biggest thing we could have hoped for in this conference – to get Russia to agree to investigating the use of chemical weapons and finding a way to bring that before an international body,” Haber said following the unanimous vote of approval.

Shortly after, the Heads of State and Government committee took on the issue of the conflict in Syria as well.

Both Russia and the U.S. agreed on the need to open a dialogue between the two countries regarding “principles behind military contracts connected with both parties of the conflict.” Delegates also concurred that a cooperative network should be created to assist non-government organizations in determining the amount of and delivering necessary aid to the Syrian people.

“The best part is that we agreed to the creation of a ‘refugee corridor’ with international peacekeepers and a no-fly zone,” said U.S. President Jeremy Iloulian following an initial round of compromises in the committee. He noted that the most difficult U.S. position for which to garner acceptance was the acknowledgment that the use of chemical weapons constituted an egregious human rights abuse.

Closing in on the 6 p.m. deadline, the Defense committee finalized wording outlining the current uses of and reporting on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The group was able to come to an agreement – with respect to the high potential for civilian casualties and the frequent need for military confidentiality – to encourage transparency in national UAV programs and increased security mechanisms.

After much compromise and changes in phrasing, the policy recommendation on UAVs was passed unanimously.

The final issue of the evening touched on by the Defense committee, how best to address and combat piracy, received general agreement amongst all delegates. The U.S. Secretary of Defense, Yevgen Sautin, recommended continued coordination in combating piracy and its root causes in the Horn of Africa and around the world. He suggested ramping up the G20-wide rotation of open water monitoring in the most affected regions.

“I would echo my Indonesian colleague in saying it’s worth studying why the scourge of piracy reemerged a few years ago,” said Sautin. “What socioeconomic causes have prompted this… How can we combat this from all sides?” He supported providing economic assistance to governments in areas experiencing endemic piracy, noting that additional resources could both deter would-be pirates and provide alternatives for income.

The institutionalization of an international anti-piracy monitoring body governed by the UN received committee-wide approval, on the suggestion of the Indonesian delegate.

When the 6 p.m. deadline for all five committees passed, a few groups were still working to revise and format language before submitting their policy initiatives. The Heads of State and Government reconvened at 7:30 p.m. to review and ultimately ratify all proposals. Thursday, the third and final day of negotiations, saw delegates finish up just before 10 p.m.

Y8 Dispatches: Thursday Morning

Dispatch from London and Team USA 2013

Committees began to finalize their written communiqués Thursday morning, the final day of negotiations, following a day of informal deliberations and sightseeing across London.

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In the International Development committee, USAID Administrator Jordan Sanderson promoted the use of mobile apps to supply and track monetary and material aid and aid delivery in using technology to encourage participatory governance and open data flow. This could be accomplished, he said, through disbursements directly to mobile bank accounts and accompany surveys to improve transactions and user experience.

“As a broad term, this strategy needs to be open-sourced; it can’t just be governments sharing this information. It needs to come from the ground up,” Sanderson said of the information-sharing capabilities of the applications.

The development committee as a whole had little disagreement over the recommendations, with the European Union and Mexico especially promoting the increased use of technology to assess aid effectiveness.

“We should take a multinational approach to alleviating poverty with specific solutions,” said the Mexican delegate, Carlos Molina, referring to the use of mobile apps and cross-country microfinancing to support initiatives like increased access to education and eradicating famine.

Discussing carbon dioxide emission reduction, the Energy & Climate Change committee dealt with current carbon dioxide reduction regulations, the possibility of a regional cap-and-trade system, and increased transparency in national emission reporting. There was also broad support to limit global temperature increases to two degrees Celsius.

Drew Holden, the U.S. EPA Administrator, agreed with the Europen Union and Indonesia in regards to revising the UN-backed Kyoto Protocol of 1997.

“In addition to updating the Kyoto Protocol, we need to make other substantive changes. We cannot wait until 2020 to put new groundwork in place,” said Holden. He supported setting universal carbon emission standards across the board, ensuring that each state’s individual regulations “have scientific support, international support.”

The matter of prisoner’s rights became a very contentious issue in the Justice committee, with the United States, Germany, South Africa, Canada, Russia and France differing greatly on the prospect of prisoner voting rights, among other things.

“Most people are not in prison for political beliefs, they’re in prison for committing violent, heinous crimes,” said U.S. Attorney General Dane Shikman, in regard to South Africa’s contention that political freedoms ought to be exercised even in prison. “They’ve given up the right to be a free, autonomous person in society. You sacrifice far bigger things than the right to vote.”

The delegate from Canada, Matthew M. Grubisic, dissented.

“A prisoner’s rights are given to him by the government. If he cannot affect his government, then he loses a fundamental right to change the system,” Grubisic said. Many delegates argued that voting is a privilege, not a right, and consensus on the issue could not be reached. 

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Committees broke for lunch at 1 p.m., with five hours left to finalize the communiqués to be sent to the heads of state and government this evening.

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